As someone who is not a history major, I wouldn’t say that I was surprised by the range of the careers that history majors attain. The reason for this being the variety of transferable skills that an average history major seems to develop throughout their course of study, notably, communications, reading, writing and analytical skills. I am a business major here at CNM and in the unit video “What Can I Do with a History Major?” there was an individual that became a business analyst. This to me was particularly interesting as it is a career path that I have seriously considered work towards. He attributed his success in this area to his analytical as well as his critical reading and writing skills and I feel I should work towards strengthening those skills as well.

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I apologize for the late submission, the historical topic I am planning to research will be the Salem witch trials. My interest in this particular subject could be attributed to the psychology behind such a case and how religion and widespread fear can have huge consequences that are observable even today. My driving research question draft: What were the primary sources of mass hysteria witness during the Salem witch trials?

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This entire exercise has opened my eyes to the entire archival process. I know it may seem ridiculous, but this is my first time being exposed to the process that goes into analyzing primary sources and the caution needed to analyze these sources in person. Not just this but I feel like I have a much clearer understanding about some of the topics that we touched on throughout this unit and I’m confident I will be mindful of these new techniques and processes not only in this class but for the remainder of my professional career. I feel the document activity was great. It introduced the class to new skills and really made us consider new strategies and methods of thinking we may not have utilized up until now.

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